The 2012 Davitt Awards

Last Saturday The Davitt Awards were announced, the awards are given for the best crime fiction written by Australian female authors. The awards are presented by Sisters in Crime, who have been celebrating women’s writing and crime stories since 1991.

Congratulations to the winners listed below:

Adult Fiction

 A Decline in Prophets

Sulari Gentill

Returning home on a luxury liner after months abroad, Rowland Sinclair and his companions dine with a suffragette, a Bishop and a retired World Prophet. The elegant atmosphere on board is charged with tension, but civility prevails…until people start to die.

 

 

True Crime

Cold Case Files: Past Crimes Solved by New Forensic Science

Liz Porter

In this collection of fascinating cold cases from Australia, the UK and the US, award-winning writer Liz Porter shows how modern forensic science can unlock solutions for crimes and mysteries unsolved for decades, and, in some cases, centuries.

 

 

Children’s and Young Adult Fiction

 Surface Tension

Meg McKinlay

When Cassie and Liam start swimming at the lake neither of them realises the dark secrets that lie beneath. As summer heats up and the lake waters become lower and lower, the shocking truth is slowly uncovered.

 

 

Best Debut and Reader’s Choice (shared)

 Beyond Fear

Jaye Ford

At seventeen, Jodie Cramer survived a terrifying assault at the hands of three strangers. Now thirty-five, she sets out for a weekend in the country with three friends. However, unknown to the women, their secluded cabin was once the focus of a police investigation and, like Jodie, it nurtures a dark secret.

READ  University of Canberra Book of the Year Award 2014

 

 

Reader’s Choice (shared)


 The Brotherhood

Y A Erskine

When Sergeant John White, mentor, saviour and all-round good guy, is murdered during a routine call-out, the tight-knit world of Tasmania Police is rocked to the core. And as the investigation unfolds, it becomes clear that there was a great deal more to John White – and the nation’s smallest state police service – than ever met the eye.

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